Time Is Running Out

 In Charity, Fred's Blog, Fred's Blog, Giving, Gratitude, Money, People, Philanthropy

Listen to “Time is Running Out” by Fred Smith

 

If I were to pick one word to describe my mail from nonprofits in December, it would be URGENT! Every email was intent on reminding me how little time I had left to take advantage of either matching grants, the looming end-of-the-year tax deadlines or a special opportunity that would close by December 31. I don’t blame the organizations for this. It’s hard to get our attention from Thanksgiving to New Year’s Day, so something has to break through the clutter.

As well, end-of-the-year giving has grown so much in importance that a nonprofit would be foolish not to do everything they can to nudge donors that they only have a few more days left to give. One third of all annual giving is done in the month of December. More than 12% of annual giving is done in the last three days of the year. One third of all non-profits raise between 25 to 50% of their entire annual budget from the year end ask. Waiting until the last minute to give is a well-ingrained habit if you give according to the tax schedule. We really have more time than that unless we choose to put off our giving and then only constant and urgent reminders will make us respond.

There are always going to be unusual and unexpected reasons for end-of-the-year giving. However, I think the increase in urgent pleas, matching opportunities, and “only a short time left” messages are telling me I need to take a hard look at my personal giving pattern throughout the year. Am I helping to create the very thing that disturbs me?

Nonprofits work hard to make our giving regular with monthly sponsorships and automatic withdrawals. Churches (not as many as before) still have weekly offerings during the service, but not much is said throughout the year except on Stewardship Sunday. Other organizations have annual dinners, awards ceremonies, silent auctions, special events, and campaigns that generate revenue and create ways to encourage us to give. I know these are important, but are they necessary because so many of us have lost the habit of giving? We may set a goal for giving but too often we find ourselves waiting until the last minute or the next event to make the gift. Would it be better for us and the ministries and nonprofits if we had stronger habits and fewer goals?

Three Surprises

I read a thought-provoking article by James Clear titled “Forget Setting Goals. Focus on This Instead.” He distinguishes between goals and systems – or what I would call habits. Instead of setting goals, establish a pattern of behavior that you do frequently enough to become a part of your life. But here were three surprising discoveries:

Goals reduce your current happiness because you cannot be satisfied until you have reached them. You are always striving and never content until you have reached that goal.

Goals are strangely at odds with long-term progress. Meeting a goal can sometimes produce the effect of lapsing from the discipline it required to get there. It’s far better to have daily habits than the momentary exhilaration of meeting a goal.

Goals suggest you can control things you cannot. Setting unrealistic giving goals and being determined to meet them no matter what has produced some great testimonies for desperate measures – like borrowing money or selling a house to meet a commitment.

I asked a good friend if he gave annually or on a more regular basis. I liked his answer. “I don’t want to put off my gratitude until the end of the year.” So, I would like to suggest that we work on habits of giving this year and not just goals. I am going to do my part to give ministries and nonprofits some relief from the pressure of sending out those emails telling me this is my last chance and I have only three days left to give.

 

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Showing 8 comments
  • Avatar
    Cathy Lindenberg
    Reply

    Thanks for this message. I make it a goal to do all my giving in January, thus I can feel at peace knowing it’s done! As I get old I forget so many things and or feel overwhelmed by the details of life……so In January I have my car checkup, my own physical, insurances paid and my routine philanthropy done…leaves me feeling clarity, organized, accomplished and at peace!

    • Fred Smith
      Fred Smith
      Reply

      I’ll bet those organizations love you for that! A great idea.

  • Avatar
    Jim Bell
    Reply

    Ida and I have for about 20 years made our giving decisions after prayer and consideration of God’s leading, and made our gifts in January and February. Our thought was to allow those that we support know at the beginning of the year what our gift for the year is. We resist virtually all year end appeals, knowing that they are directed at others. We have personal relationships with those we support and insist on knowing those we support for several years before we start giving. We do make other gifts during the year for new appeals form ministries that we know and support. We believe God leads our decisions.

    • Fred Smith
      Fred Smith
      Reply

      Jim and Ida – I have no doubt that God leads your giving decisions!

  • Avatar
    John Thomas
    Reply

    As a leader of a ministry non-profit, I applaud your blog. It is actually hard and uncomfortable to be ‘begging’ and competing for funds at the end of the year, simply because about a third of people give in the last couple of days of the year. it would be great not to have to plead for money (in the most constructive way possible) at the end of the year because people are giving consistently through-out the year.

    • Fred Smith
      Fred Smith
      Reply

      Thank you, John! Let’s turn things upside down this year. I am taking my own advice.

  • Avatar
    David S.
    Reply

    I loved your friend’s response that he didn’t want to. “put off gratitude until the end of the year.” Though I practice a lot of giving according to long term plans and pledges, many of the most cheerfully given gifts are the result of spur-of-the-moment Holy Spirit promptings. The Good Samaritan had no idea when he got up that morning who he was going to see later that day in a ditch.

    • Fred Smith
      Fred Smith
      Reply

      The Good Samaritan was prepared for that encounter, wasn’t he? What a good story his morning would make.

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