The House Always Loses

 In Character, Church, Culture, Faith, Fred's Blog, Inheritance, People, Religion, Scripture, Teaching, Truth, Uncategorized

Listen to “The House Always Loses” by Fred Smith

 

The final commentary on the lives of many of the kings of Israel is, “He did evil and walked in the ways of Jeroboam.” But even when they did good things, the Old Testament always offers an addendum – a last line in their obituary and funeral eulogy, “Yet he walked in the ways of Jeroboam.” This was often the final word on the kings of Israel for hundreds of years.

What is this defining sin, the standard by which all the kings came to be judged? What is the sin of the house of Jeroboam and does it have any relevance for us today?

Jeroboam understood the nature of people and their attraction to an easy religion and devised a brilliant strategy to give them that and at the same time protect his interests. He did not outlaw religion or use force to control people or make them martyrs but only made them consumers of convenience and choice by using religion with only a few changes that were reasonable for everyone. He made worship more convenient and relevant for them while at the same time keeping them from Jerusalem and the house of David.

“It is too much for you to go up to Jerusalem.”

“Why make the long, expensive and dangerous journey to Jerusalem when you can worship closer to where you live with people you trust?”

“Why support an institution that tells you what to do when you can have a religion that is more compatible with what you want – and deserve?”

And here is the twisted genius of it: They believed him. They trusted him. After all, he was a man of the people with their best interests in mind. He did not turn them into unbelieving atheists but only more down-to-earth people with a relevant religion. He relieved them of the burden of orthodoxy and obedience. They did not kill prophets nor did they need to as they could co-opt or simply ignore them. He even appointed his own priests. It was a good time for a man of the people and the people themselves. He gave them a way to find happiness, convenience, comfort and common-sense religion.

“We can disobey God and at the same time live blessed lives.”

“We can have a practical religion with none of the unrealistic expectations and still remain true to the Lord.”

“We can serve idols with none of the unpleasant aftertaste.”

People are not comfortable with holding two contradictory beliefs, ideas, or values at the same time. We want to resolve conflict in a way that eliminates our discomfort, often without having to choose one or the other.  Jeroboam understood this in the nature of people and was able to sell them on the possibility of choosing both – to combine them – with no thought for any consequences.

We need religion – but a practical religion that makes sense in the real world where we live. We need it to be convenient and pleasant – especially pleasant without all that chatter about repentance and sin. Jeroboam, in a way, only encouraged what they already believed. In a deeply divided nation he accelerated their impulses and gave them permission. St. Augustine would say that he led them down the path of disordered loves. There was no force or compulsion – only giving their inclinations the encouragement they desired.

Everything was fine at first, but over time their disordered loves became a sin so corrosive that it led eventually to the destruction of his whole family and the nation itself. What was at first merely a political accommodation to people became a horror they could not have predicted or imagined.

“They bowed down to all the starry hosts, and they worshiped Baal. They sacrificed their sons and daughters in the fire. They practiced divination and sorcery and sold themselves to do evil in the eyes of the Lord, provoking him to anger.”

They followed worthless idols and themselves became worthless. Even the best kings could not undo the long-term effects of what Jeroboam introduced. It became a permanent characteristic and practice of the people. It had become so woven into their character that no change in leadership could pull it out without unraveling the whole.

Jeroboam’s one astute insight and practical trade-off resulted years later in the slaughter of his whole house and the fall of Israel. That is what the Bible means when it says there was a sin of the house of a person. It was not just that person alone but that sin became a character trait of generations of his descendants. It became the sin that defined them and, in time, was the seed of their destruction. It is true that, in time, your sin will find you out. But not only you alone and that is the tragedy.

Art by Mary McCleary

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Showing 16 comments
  • Avatar
    Michele Elyachar
    Reply

    Dear Fred, I am assuming you’re speaking of the present administration very well done

    • Fred Smith
      Fred Smith
      Reply

      I think Jeroboam is a symbol for many rulers and influential people who delude and take advantage of people all through history. Jeroboam is a pattern that plays out time after time – like Samson or Gideon.

  • Avatar
    Dwight Gibson
    Reply

    Thank you Fred. Profound and thoughtful. Very timely insight for some work I am doing.

    • Fred Smith
      Fred Smith
      Reply

      Thank you, Dwight. Jeroboam is a “type”, isn’t he? He’s a universal.

  • Avatar
    Michael Meadows
    Reply

    Thank you for sharing this, Fred. As always, your insights are thought-provoking and filled with great wisdom.

    • Fred Smith
      Fred Smith
      Reply

      Thank you, Michael! Some one said they realized these characters are real people – more real than we sometimes imagine.

  • Avatar
    Joe Wu
    Reply

    Very helpful, Fred. Your column reminds me of Matt. 10:39 about the importance of keeping with the right priority in life – a life driven by being faithful first to God and his agenda before our own. While it continues to be a struggle, I am grateful for your faithful encouragements through the biblical truths crystallized through your weekly columns such as this. Blessings to you, Fred!

    • Fred Smith
      Fred Smith
      Reply

      Thank you, Joe. I appreciate your taking the time to read and to write a comment. The Old Testament is full of characters we can recognize in our own world!

  • Avatar
    Steve Perry
    Reply

    People cannot live with a contradiction between their beliefs and their behavior. One of these will need to change to accommodate the other. Which do you think is the easier to change, one’s beliefs or one’s behavior?

    • Fred Smith
      Fred Smith
      Reply

      Let me know when you figure that one out! My money would be on beliefs have to change first but C.S. Lewis said our behavior can change our beliefs. If we act as if we love someone we may actually come to love them.

  • Avatar
    Greg Smith
    Reply

    Thought provoking, and timely as I have been reading through the Bible chronologically and am in the Kings section. All those cycles repeated over and over, until God finally says, enough! Your post also highlights a danger of contextualization, sometimes we become a culture follower rather than a Christ Follower and culture maker. When our “prophetic voice” sounds similar to the surrounding, unbelieving culture, we should be very concerned. In the times of the Kings, there were also many false prophets, because it fed people what they wanted to hear. Thanks for the post.

    • Fred Smith
      Fred Smith
      Reply

      Thank you, Greg. I could stay in Kings and Chronicles for months. Almost every lesson we need to learn about human nature is in those books. I appreciate your perspective and agree that discernment is a gift we need to value more than we do.

  • Avatar
    Toni S Hibbs
    Reply

    Not a very good pattern to keep being repeated.
    Very thought provoking, Fred.

    • Fred Smith
      Fred Smith
      Reply

      Thank you, Toni. It doesn’t mean giving up on compassion but trying to eliminate dependency.

  • Avatar
    jack
    Reply

    the importance of keeping with the right priority in life – a life driven by being faithful first to God and his agenda before our own. While it continues to be a struggle, I am grateful for your faithful encouragements through the biblical truths crystallized through your weekly columns such as this. Blessings to you, Fred!

    • Fred Smith
      Fred Smith
      Reply

      Thank you, Jack. It is a discipline and easier some weeks than others – just like everything else in life!

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